Philip Goff: Consciousness and Fundamental Reality, Panpsychism, Atheism & God

WATCH: https://youtu.be/W5Fi4Gsy3kw

Philip Goff is Associate Professor in Philosophy at Durham University, UK. His main research interest is consciousness, although he also has a sideline in political philosophy (taxation, globalisation, social justice). He blogs at Conscience and Consciousness, and his work has been published in The Guardian and Philosophy Now, among others. He is the author of Consciousness and Fundamental Reality (Oxford University Press, 2017) and Galileo’s Error: Foundations for a New Science of Consciousness (Vintage, 2019), and the co-editor of Is Consciousness Everywhere? Essays on Panpsychism (forthcoming, 2022). He is now working on a book exploring the middle ground between God and atheism, and is the co-host of the 'Mind Chat' podcast.

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TIMESTAMPS:
(0:00) - Introduction
(1:00) - The Mind-Body Problem
(3:35) - Influential philosophers of mind
(8:49) - Panpsychism & Non-Duality
(17:34) - Physicalism
(21:08) - Panpsychism & spirituality/secularism
(25:50) - Anil Seth's consciousness as a controlled hallucination
(31:09) - Limitations of Scientism
(38:05) - Heterophenomenology & quasi-phenomenal experiences
(45:57) - Idealism vs Panpsychism
(51:25) - Differences in culture & its implications on values, morals & ethics
(55:20) - Practical implications of Panpsychism (e.g. abortion, veganism etc.)
(1:01:19) - Best arguments against Panpsychism
(1:05:28) - Integrated Information Theory
(1:10:20) - Roger Penrose, Rupert Sheldrake & other theories of consciousness
(1:16:00) - Mysterianism
(1:19:05) - Panpsychist reading recommendations
(1:22:26) - Philip's new book & the links between religion & atheism
(1:26:04) - Cosmic teleology
(1:35:38) - Taking one step closer to the Mind-Body Solution
(1:38:39) - Conclusion