Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts

BBC  |  Podcast , ±58 min episodes every day  | 
Woman's Hour brings you the big celebrity names and leading women in the news, with subjects ranging widely from politics to health, law, education, arts, parenting, relationships, work, fiction, food and fashion. Presented by Jenni Murray and Jane Garvey. Find out more at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour

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07
JUL

Lady Unchained, RJ Palacio, Anastasia Skelton, Kate Daniels, Charlotte Burton and Isabelle Duncan

When Lady Unchained was 21, she was sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison following a fight in a club when trying to protect her sister. While inside, she began to write and perform poetry. She now performs her spoken-word poetry around the country and runs poetry workshops for those in prison as well as ex-offenders. She talks to Emma Barnett about her debut poetry book "Behind Bars" which is released today.

American author RJ Palacio, who wrote the best-selling Wonder which is now celebrating its 10th anniversary, talks about the book’s sequel, White Bird, which is to be released as a film later this year.

More than 85,000 refugees have arrived in the UK so far under the Ukraine Family and Sponsorship Schemes and we’ve heard many heart warming stories about mothers and their children integrating into communities up and down the country. But it’s not always straightforward, with some families and hosts coming up against cultural and linguistic barriers. We hear how Anastasia Skelton, a Ukrainian living in the UK who is currently volunteering as a coordinator in Canterbury, helping to match refugees with host families, and Kate Daniels, a family therapist, are working to ease the situation.

And we hear how a cricket club in Sussex is changing its rules when it comes to white kit for women players as it can be tricky for them to wear when they’re on their period. Lewes Priory Cricket Club is allowing its young players to wear black. Will it catch on? We talk to Charlotte Burton, the Women and Girls Development Officer at Sussex Cricket, and Isabelle Duncan, the cricket historian, commentator and author of 'Skirting the Boundary'.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson
Studio Manager: Emma Harth
06
JUL

06/07/2022

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.
05
JUL

All-women team travelling to Ukraine border, Euro 2022, Parenting adult children

As part of a charity mission this month an all-women team are travelling from the UK to Ukraine with much needed supplies and plan to return with 28 refugee women and children, and their pets. Two of the women on the trip are Barbara Want and Suzanne Pullin.

Half of all children in lone-parent families are now living in poverty according to a new report. We speak to the co-author of the report, Xiaowei Xu, a Senior Research Economist at the IFS, and Victoria Benson, Chief Executive of Gingerbread.

Tomorrow the Women’s Euros will begin - England and Northern Ireland are taking part and 2022 looks like it'll be a huge year for the women’s game with matches shown on terrestrial TV, record attendances, greater visibility and awareness. A new exhibition Goal Power! at Brighton Museum celebrates the achievements of the trailblazers in the women's game and Charlotte Petts spoke to some of them.

There's no doubt it's challenging being a parent when your children depend upon you for pretty much everything. But what about later on, when they are supposedly independent and all grown up? Surely it gets easier. Not necessarily according to authors of two new books, Celia Dodd and Annette Byford join Emma in the studio.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Emma Pearce
04
JUL

Policing and domestic abuse, Breastfeeding, Football, The business of porn

A joint investigation by The College of Policing and Fire & Rescue Service and the Independent Office for Police Conduct has found that there are ‘systemic deficiencies’ in the way some police forces deal with allegations of domestic abuse against their own officers. We discuss with deputy chief constable Maggie Blythe, national police lead for Violence Against Women and Girls; David Tucker, head of Crime and Criminal Justice, College of Policing and Nogah Ofer from the CWJ.

It's a big year for women's football and the Women's Euros begin on Wednesday, but women have long been playing the beautiful game. An exhibition at Brighton Museum called Goal Power! Women's Football 1894-2022 features the stories of veteran players, Charlotte Pett asked them for their memories.

A new study has shown that children who are born at or just before the weekend to disadvantaged mothers are less likely to be breastfed, due to poorer breastfeeding support services in hospitals at weekends. Co-author of the study, Professor Emla Fitzsimons from the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies and Clare Livingstone, professional policy adviser and lead on infant feeding for the Royal College of Midwives join Emma.

It's probably no surprise to hear that porn is a multi-billion dollar business and a huge monopoliser of the internet. A new podcast series, Hot Money, by Financial Times reporters Patricia Nilsson and Alex Barker explores how the business of online porn works and finds out who is actually in control. Patricia Nilsson joins Emma.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
02
JUL

Weekend Woman's Hour: The law on abortion, Aparna Sen, Being lesbian in the military

The overturning by the US Supreme Court of the landmark Roe v Wade ruling has prompted many of you to get in touch to share your reactions and experiences. But what does the law in the UK say about a woman’s right to an abortion? We hear from Professor Fiona De Londras, the Chair of Global Legal Studies at Birmingham Law School.

Aparna Sen is one of India's best loved and most successful film directors. Her career has spanned 40 years and she's explored issues around mental health, sexual abuse and infidelity. Aparna is in England for the London Indian Film Festival.

Have you ever noticed the queue for the women’s toilets is much longer than the queue for the men’s? Two Bristol university graduates have tried to resolve this issue, by inventing female urinals. They joined Emma to explain how it works.

How do you heal and get through a break up? Annie Lord is Vogue’s dating columnist. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her debut book, Notes on Heartbreak. A candid exploration of the best and worst of love, she talks about nursing a broken heart and her own attempts to move on in the current dating climate; from disastrous rebound sex to sending ill-advised nudes, stalking your ex’s new girlfriend and the sharp indignity of being ghosted.

Welsh singer and dancer Marged Siôn is with us. She's in the band, Self Esteem and appears in a new Welsh-language short film called Hunan Hyder which means self-confidence). She talks to us about trauma, healing and appearing on stage with Adele!

Dame Kelly Holmes came out as a lesbian last week. The Olympic champion served in the army in the late 1980s, when you could face prison for being gay as a member of the military. Dame Kelly spoke of her worry that she would still face consequences if she were to let her sexuality be known. It wasn’t until 2000 that a ban on being gay and serving in the Army, Navy or RAF was lifted. Emma Riley was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1993 for being a lesbian.

An American pregnant woman who was on holiday in Malta this month couldn't get an induced medical miscarriage when she needed it because of the country's strict abortion laws. Andrea Prudente ended up going to Mallorca to get treatment, where she’s recovering in a hotel.
01
JUL

01/07/2022

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.
30
JUN

Annie Lord, Menovests, Roe v Wade, The Fellowship

How do you heal and get through a break up? Annie Lord is Vogue’s dating columnist. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her debut book, Notes on Heartbreak. A candid exploration of the best and worst of love, she talks about nursing a broken heart and her own attempts to move on in the current dating climate; from disastrous rebound sex to sending ill-advised nudes, stalking your ex’s new girlfriend and the sharp indignity of being ghosted.

The overturning by the US Supreme Court of the landmark Roe v Wade ruling has prompted many of you to get in touch to share your reactions and experiences. One listener, Nicola, wanted to tell us about her mum - who died after having a legal termination that should have been safe, in 1968. Closer to home there's been a high-level summit about buffer zones at abortion clinics. Emma speaks to Scotland's Green MSP, Gillian Mackay, who has drawn up a members bill which aims to introduce protest-free buffer zones around clinics. And what does the law in the UK say about a woman’s right to an abortion? We hear from Professor Fiona De Londras, the Chair of Global Legal Studies at Birmingham Law School.

The senior backbench Conservative MP Sir Iain Duncan Smith and some of his fellow MPs were given the opportunity this week to find out first hand exactly how uncomfortable a menopausal hot flush can be, especially when you’re in the workplace. As part of an event raising awareness around the country’s shortage of HRT, Sir Iain and some his colleagues from both sides of the House of Commons, tried out a so-called MenoVest, a special piece of clothing fitted with heat pads, to simulate the extreme discomfort which many menopausal women have to live with. Emma speaks to Sir Iain Duncan Smith and Lesley Salem, who had the idea to create the vest.

The Fellowship is a play which looks at the children of the Windrush generation and the relationship between Marcia and Dawn, two black sisters struggling to take care of their dying mother whilst juggling their turbulent personal lives. Emma speaks to Director Paulette Randall and actor Suzette Llewellyn, who plays Marcia.
29
JUN

Ghislaine Maxwell sentencing, Minister for Justice in Ireland, Dame Deborah James, Trans sport, Music education

Ghislaine Maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for helping former financier Jeffrey Epstein abuse young girls. We speak to Equality Lawyer Georgina Calvert Lee about her statement in court where she addressed her victims, saying she empathised with them, and that she hoped her prison sentence would allow them "peace and finality".

The tragic killing of Ashling Murphy in Tullamore, County Offaly in Ireland in January of this year sparked a huge public outcry, and has been seen as a watershed moment in how the country tackles violence against women and girls. Ireland has launched its third national Domestic, Sexual and Gender-Based violence strategy. Emma speaks to the Minister for Justice in Ireland, Helen McEntee about what it aims to achieve.

Dame Deborah James has died aged 40 from bowel cancer. The cancer campaigner, blogger, broadcaster and former teacher had been receiving end-of-life care at home and raised millions for cancer research. She was given a damehood in May in recognition of her fundraising. Emma speaks to GP Dr Ellie Cannon, and Julia Bradbury who has spoken about her journey with breast cancer.

Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries has told UK sporting bodies that "elite and competitive women's sport must be reserved for people born of the female sex". We get the details from our reporter, Jane Dougall.

The National Plan for Music Education was published by the UK government last Saturday. Called The Power of Music to Change Lives, their ambition is for every pupil to have at least one hour of high quality music education a week. We speak to Veronica Wadley, Baroness Fleet, the chair of the advisory panel that published the report, and YolanDa Brown who contributed to it as a MOBO award-winning saxophonist and Chair of Youth Music.
28
JUN

Andrea Prudente. Women in science. Loo queues at festivals

A pregnant woman who was on holiday in Malta this month could not get an induced medical miscarriage when she needed it because of the country's strict abortion laws. Maltese doctors told Andrea Prudente, who was nearly 4 months pregnant, that the placenta was partly detached and her pregnancy was no longer viable but there was still a beating heart. The complications meant that her life was at risk. But in Malta terminating a pregnancy is completely illegal. Andrea ended up going to Mallorca to get treatment, where she’s recovering in a hotel. She joins Emma.

Women in science are less likely to have their contributions recognised than their male counterparts, for example on a scientific paper or named on a patent, according to new analysis. A team of economists in the US found that women often have to work twice as hard as men to earn credit. But what is it like for women in science here in the UK? Monica Grady, CBE is a professor at the Open University. She joins Emma as does co-author of the US study, professor Julia Lane from the Wagner School of Public Policy at NYU.

Have you ever noticed the queue for the women’s toilets is much longer than the queue for the men’s? Two Bristol university graduates have tried to resolve this issue, by inventing female urinals. They join Emma to explain how it works.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Emma Pearce
27
JUN

Being lesbian in the military

Dame Kelly Holmes came out as a lesbian last week. The Olympic champion served in the army in the late 1980’s, when you could face prison for being gay as a member of the military. Dame Kelly spoke of her worry that she would still face consequences if she were to let her sexuality be known. It wasn’t until 2000 that a ban on being gay and serving in the Army, Navy or RAF was lifted. Emma Riley was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1993 for being a lesbian, she joins Emma in the studio alongside Caroline Paige, joint Chief Executive of Fighting with Pride.
25
JUN

On Weekend Woman’s Hour: Kate Bush, Olivia Harrison, Amanda Blanc, Althea Gibson, frozen embryos and women in comedy

In a world exclusive, Kate Bush speaks to Emma Barnett about being discovered by a new generation and making it to number 1 in the UK singles charts 44 years after her first chart-topper Wuthering Heights. Running Up That Hill was first released in 1985 and its use in the Netflix hit series Stranger Things has made Kate Bush a social media and streaming sensation.

The physical and emotional challenges of in vitro fertilisation, or IVF, never fade from your memory - whatever the outcome. But what happens when you have been lucky enough to have a child or children and you still have frozen embryos in storage you are sure you will not use? You can donate to another couple in need, to science, let them be discarded or continue to preserve them. Alison Murdoch, Professor of Reproductive Medicine at Newcastle University and two women who have faced this join Emma.

The comedians Katherine Ryan and Sara Pascoe have been making headlines in recent weeks following comments they made on Katherine’s new TV show. Both revealed instances when they’ve worked with men they believe to be predatory and despite complaining these men have not been reprimanded. Emma is joined by Kathryn Roberts who quit comedy because of her experiences and also by Chloe Petts who will be performing her show Transience at the Edinburgh Fringe this summer.

Olivia Harrison has penned a book of poetry called "Came the Lightening" to celebrate her husband, George Harrison's life, more than twenty years after his death.. As lead guitarist of The Beatles, his most famous songs included While My Guitar Gently Weeps, and Here Comes the Sun. What prompted her to share her memories in poetry? She tells Emma.

As Wimbledon is set to begin on Monday, we discover the story behind Althea Gibson the first Black woman to win Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958. Writer and performer Kemi-Bo Jacobs was so inspired by her that she has written a one-woman play, 'All White Everything But Me' about her. She joins Anita to tell her more.

The Treasury's Women in Finance Charter has published its annual review looking at gender diversity within the financial sector in the UK for 2021. Amanda Blanc is CEO of Aviva, the UK’s leading insurer and leads the Women in Finance Charter and speaks to Emma about the review as well as her experiences of sexism as one of a ...
24
JUN

24/06/2022

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

27 episodes

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