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17
AUG
6pm

The US Federal Reserve releases its policy meeting minutes

The US Federal Reserve say rates will continue to go up in the short term but there is still a long road ahead. Author and economist Linda Yueh explains why and Susan Schmidt from Exchange Capital Resources in Chicago tells us about the impact on the markets.

Cuba says it will allow foreign investors into its wholesale and retail trade for the first time in 60 years. The policy aims to tackle shortages of basic goods, like food and medicine - but stops short of fully opening trade. We speak to Ricardo Torres, a Research Fellow at the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at American University in Washington who’s been a consultant to Cuban and foreign companies interested in Cuba.

Elon Musk’s tweets suggesting that he wanted to buy Manchester United caused markets to briefly jump by as much as 17%, before Musk clarified it was a joke. Alex Shaw, general editor at the cable sports channel ESPN in the UK, gives his analysis.
17
AUG
11am

Inflation: Can countries tackle it together?

Rising prices are affecting consumers almost everywhere across the globe. But the response from governments and central banks has varied greatly. So is there a common solution? As inflation in the UK tops 10%, nursery owner Sharon Birch tells us how tough it's been to manage. We're also joined by Walid Koudmani from X-Trade Brokers, who explains the policy challenges facing lawmakers from country to country.

Sophie Lund-Yates from Hargreaves Landsdown has the day's market update.

We go to Cuba, where the government has announced a drastic move aimed at reinvigorating the island's economy.

Also, talking football: it's less than 100 days until the World Cup kicks off in Qatar; and is Elon Musk really joking about buying Manchester United? We're joined by The Athletic's Joey D'Urso, and Sarah Needleman from the Wall Street Journal.
16
AUG
6pm

Chinese tech giants hand algorithm data to government

Some of China's tech giants have shared details of their algorithms with Beijing for the first time. Tech reporter Kari Paul joins us from Oakland, California.

The first day of campaigning is getting under way in Brazil’s presidential elections, due to take place in October. Bloomberg economist Adriana Dupito explains the economic impact from São Paulo.

Inflation in Canada has hit 7.6%. We hear from economist Gurupdesh Pandher and Rachel Blais who is the director of Qajuqturvik Community Food Centre about the impact it’s having on people’s everyday lives in Canada.

Colossal Biosciences, a Texas-based biotechnology “de-extinction” company has linked up with the University of Melbourne, which earlier this year received a $3.6m philanthropic gift to open a Tasmanian tiger genetic restoration lab. CEO of Colossal, Ben Lamm tells us all about the exciting project.
16
AUG
11am

Kenya Presidential Elections: Raila Odinga reject results

Runner-up Raila Odinga has rejected the results of Kenya's presidential election saying that the figures announced on Monday were "null and void".

He alleged vote-rigging and accused the electoral chairman of bullying election counters who disagreed with him.

Chinese internet giants including Alibaba, ByteDance and Tencent have shared details of their algorithms with China's regulators for the first time.

In the US Meta and Alphabet have successfully argued they are trade secrets amid calls for more disclosure.

Across Europe a combination of unusual summer heat levels and abnormal storms, have badly affected agricultural production which meteorologists say could become the continent’s worst drought in more than 500 years.
15
AUG
6pm

William Ruto to become Kenya's new president

Kenya's deputy president, William Ruto, has been declared the winner of a tight race against the opposition leader and former Prime Minister Raila Odinga. We talk to Ken Gichinga, chief economist from Mentorial Economics, in Nairobi, about the markets' expectations from the new leader.

Scotland has become the first country in the world to issue a law requiring public settings to provide free period products. Georgie Nicholson from social enterprise Hey Girls discusses the challenges in the fight against period poverty.

The Rhine, one of Europe's most important trade routes, has seen its water levels fall as low as 40 centimetres in certain parts, preventing many commercial vessels from navigating. Claus Vistesen, Chief Economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, explains why this river is a key route for trade.

And we analyse the latest developments in the markets with Arbor Financial Service's Peter Jankovskis.
15
AUG
11am

Is China's economy in trouble?

China has cut its benchmark interest rate by a tenth of one percent which Craig Botham, Chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics explains why this is being seen as a further sign that China's economy could be in trouble.

State-owned Aramco announced record profits of nearly 50 billion US dollars for the second three-month period of this year. It comes as Russia's invasion of Ukraine has led to oil and gas prices trending much higher. Our correspondent Sameer Hashmi joins us live from Dubai.

It's exactly a year today since the Afghan capital Kabul fell to Taliban forces, marking the end of a 20 year experiment in western-style liberal democracy in the country. Since then the economy has collapsed, throwing tens of millions of people into abject poverty.

Former Afghan finance minister, Khaled Payenda ran the finance ministry for the last six months of democratic rule right up to August of last year, he speaks to World Business Report’s Ed Butler.

Thailand’s economy has expanded at the fastest pace in a year, following the recent easing of Covid restrictions. Bruce Haxton runs tuk tuk tours, he speaks to us from Chiang Mai about how business has been for him.
12
AUG
6pm

Consumer confidence grows in the US

People in the US are spending more than earlier in the year as the country's consumer sentiment survey results rise to a three-month high. We hear from the director of the University of Michigan’s survey Joanne Hsu and restaurant owner Duane Greenleaf.

An armed man who held customers and staff hostage in a Beirut bank has been hailed as a hero. Journalist Wael Talib explains from Lebanon.

The French nuclear company EDF is suing its own government for more than eight billion dollars after it was forced to sell energy to consumers at a loss. Carole Nakhle an energy economist in Germany tells us whether this could set a precedent of nationalising energy countries across Europe.

(Picture: HOUSTON, TEXAS - JULY 15: A customer shops in a Kroger grocery store on July 15, 2022 in Houston, Texas. Picture Credit: Getty Images).
12
AUG
11am

South Korea pardons the 'Samsung Prince'

Samsung heir Lee Jae-yong, who was convicted of bribery and embezzlement in 2017, has been granted a special presidential pardon.South Korea's government justified the move, saying the de-facto leader of the country's biggest company was needed back at the helm to spearhead economic recovery post-pandemic. We speak to journalist Nemo Kim, who also teaches politics at Soon Chun Hyang University. Wildfires and drought are continuing to affect large swathes of Europe. We assess the impact on the shipping and wine industries. The shortlist of seven UK cities to host next year's Eurovision Song Contest has been announced. But what are the economic pros and cons of hosting the event?
11
AUG
6pm

US Attorney General asks judge to unseal Trump warrant

The US Justice Department is asking a Florida court to unseal the warrant that let FBI agents search former President Donald Trump's home. If granted, the request would make the documents available to the public. We hear more from the BBC’s Washington correspondent Nomia Iqbal.

Canada is temporarily banning the importation of restricted handguns ahead of more restrictive, permanent measures from Parliament. We talk to economist Ed Lotterman.

The Unification Church, commonly known as the Moonies, have come under the spotlight in Japan after the assassination of former prime minister Shinzo Abe. Professor Levi McLauhglin explains why a religious group is so controversial and how it became so powerful in Japan.

The BBC’s Suranjana Tewari reports about a celebrity’s investments in Asia to help develop talent in the snooker industry. We also discuss the latest from the markets with Greenwood Capital’s Walter Todd.

Meta’s BlenderBot3 doesn’t seem to like its own boss, Mark Zuckerberg. We ask Bloomberg’s Charlie Hancock what lies behind the concept of the recently launched chatbot.
11
AUG
11am

South Africa and EU reach deal over stranded citrus

South Africa and the EU have reached agreement over tonnes of citrus fruits that have been stranded in European ports. It follows a change in rules that means exporters now have to apply a cold treatment to things like oranges and lemons to prevent the spread of pests. We speak to Hannes de Waal from Sundays River Citrus in South Africa. Facebook's parent company Meta introduces a new prototype chatbot, Blender Bot 3, which told the BBC that Mark Zuckerberg exploits its users for money. India's hotel sector bounces back in the second quarter, with growth of 300%. We hear from a photographer in Bangalore, who's seen an uptick to his Airbnb bookings.
10
AUG
6pm

Disney overtakes Netflix in streaming war

Disney, the American media giant, has beaten expectations in its latest results. Its on-demand platform now has more than 152 million subscribers, but it comes at a time of declining revenues for streaming services.

Meanwhile, there's been lower-than-predicted inflation in the US. To crunch the numbers, we're joined by Susan Schmidt, Head of US Equity at Exchange Capital Resources in Chicago; and Randall Kroszner, a former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board.

It's almost a year since the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Now a group of leading economists is calling on the US President, Joe Biden, to unfreeze the country's cash assets. We speak to Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz about how that could help citizens.

In his first week in office, Colombia's new president, Gustavo Petro, has announced sweeping tax reforms aimed at rebalancing the country. Sergio Guzman from think tank Colombia Risk Analysis explains how it could make or break his leadership.

We're also joined by Stefano Aurecchio from the Neopolitan Pizza Association, as delivery chain Domino's pulls out of Italy.
10
AUG
11am

US inflation eases following petrol price drop

A fall in petrol prices in the US helped to ease the pace of price rises in July. The Labor Department said the annual inflation rate, the pace at which prices rise, was 8.5% in July, down from June when it surged to 9.1%, the Labor Department said. Our North America Business Correspondent Michelle Fleury talks us through the figures. The World Bank says Afghanistan is facing a food and debt crisis, one year since the Taliban regained power. The US-based pizza delivery chain Domino's is pulling out of Italy after seven years in the country. Celebrity chef, author and TV personality Gennaro Contaldo weighs up the pros and cons of Neapolitan pizza and American-style slices.

38 episodes

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