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25
SEP
12am

Update: How will markets react to a second stimulus package?

As Nancy Pelosi suggests a second government stimulus package of $2.4 trillion, Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York explains how the market reacted.
Also in the programme, all this week we're examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today we go to Ohio, and hear from the chair of its Democratic Party, David Pepper, and farmer Paul Kalmbach, who voted for President Trump in 2016.
24
SEP
5pm

Coronavirus: Israel tightens second lockdown to avoid 'abyss'

Israel is tightening its second nationwide coronavirus lockdown as case counts rise. Mehul Srivastava is Israel bureau chief for the Financial Times in Jerusalem, and explains the government's latest moves. And we hear how Israel's businesses could be impacted from Uriel Lynn, president of the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce. Also in the programme, all this week we've been examining issues affecting voters in key US battleground states ahead of November's presidential election. Today Rahul Tandon finds out what is at the front of people's minds in Texas. Plus, research from Cranfield University warns once again that the boardrooms of the UK's biggest firms don't look much like the UK itself, when it comes to female representation. Professor Susan Vinnicombe is founding director of the Cranfield International Centre for Women Leaders, and discusses the findings of the 15th edition of its Female FTSE Board Report.

(Picture: A sculpture in Tel Aviv encouraging Israelis to wear masks. Picture credit: EPA.)
23
SEP
5pm

ILO: global jobs picture deteriorating

The International Labour Organisation says the impact of Covid-19 on jobs is worsening. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us details of their latest research. Also in the programme, continuing our series examining issues affecting voters in key swing states ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been taking a closer look at Florida. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how the pandemic is forcing breweries to adapt.

(Picture: A jobs protest in Washington DC. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
23
SEP
12am

Update: Will the US get a second stimulus package?

Are politicians in Washington too preoccupied with a possible Supreme Court nomination to think about the need for a second stimulus package? We ask Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading.
Also, we consider how agricultural tariffs, imposed by President Trump in his trade battle with China, may have impacted the vote amongst American farmers in Florida in a report from journalist Heather van Blokland.
22
SEP
5pm

UK restricts hospitality to combat coronavirus

UK prime minister Boris Johnson has announced new measures to tackle coronavirus. With new rules compelling the closure of bars and restaurants at 10pm, we ask Kate Nicholls, chief executive of the industry body UK Hospitality how the sector will cope. And Kim Sneppen, professor of biocomplexity at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen tells us how Denmark is handling a recent rise in coronavirus infections. Also in the programme, we're focusing this week on issues affecting voters in key battleground states ahead of November's US presidential election. Today, the BBC's Fergus Nicoll has been hearing how economic arguments could play on voters' minds in Pennsylvania. Plus, following India's ban of the popular Chinese social media app TikTok earlier this year, homegrown Indian competitors are filling the void. Chingari has managed to attract 30 million users to its platform in just three months, and we hear more from its founder, Sumit Ghosh.

(Picture: A waitress takes an order in London. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
22
SEP
12am

Update: US markets wobble on political uncertainty

The death of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg brings further uncertainty to markets, which were already feeling the uncertainty of the upcoming presidential election, as we hear from markets commentator Peter Jankovskis.
Erin Delmore reports from Pennsylvania on the state's steel industry, and how a shortage of the metal is affecting some breweries, who badly need cans to package and transport their beer.
And we hear how the coronavirus pandemic has affected demand for filming in one of America's most popular locations - Philadelphia.
21
SEP
5pm

New European coronavirus restrictions

More than 800,000 Madrid residents were ordered to stay at home as Covid-19 cases rise. A number of European governments are considering stricter enforcement measures as they try to contain the pandemic, and a bar owner in Madrid tells us how the new restrictions are likely to affect his business. Also in the programme, leaked documents involving about $2tn of transactions have revealed how some of the world's biggest banks have allowed criminals to move money around the world. One of the cases shows that the United Arab Emirates' central bank failed to act on warnings about a local firm which was helping Iran to evade sanctions. Simon Cox, investigations editor for BBC Arabic brings us the details. Farmers in India are protesting a controversial set of new agriculture laws passed by the country's parliament. The BBC's Arunodhay Mukharji explains why the farmers think the new laws will make them substantially worse off. Plus, we have a report examining the impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on nightclubs around the world.
21
SEP
2am

Chinese apps get reprieve from US ban

As President Trump's deadline to ban new downloads of Chinese social media apps nears, he announces that a deal has been reached for US companies to take control of the video sharing site TikTok. Meanwhile users of the messaging service WeChat win a court injunction to halt the ban. We get the latest from Kim Lyons of the Verge. We also hear about the leak of more than 2,000 documents which seem to reveal serious failings in how the world's biggest banks deal with dirty money and Tim Alderslade, the head of Airlines UK makes a plea for an air bridge between New York and London, to save the fortunes of transatlantic airlines and airports suffering from a slump in passengers because of the pandemic.
(Image: TikTok, WeChat & Trump montage, Credit: Reuters)
18
SEP
5pm

US ready to ban TikTok and WeChat on Sunday

TikTok and WeChat face a US install ban on Sunday, unless President Trump approves a deal. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman talks us through the latest moves in a long-running source of tension between Washington and Beijing.
Also in the programme, continuing our series looking at key issues ahead of November's US presidential election, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt asks whether environmental issues will have much of an impact on how people choose to cast their vote.
Plus, we find out why this year's Indian Premier League cricket season is being played in the United Arab Emirates.
18
SEP
12am

Update: Investors 'want more' from US Central Bank

Stock markets suggested the US Central Bank needs to do more to prevent a sell-off, after keeping interest rates unchanged, says Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York. Plus, we hear from a surgeon in Calcutta, India about how the record-high coronavirus cases in the country manifest in his working day - and why vaccine inequality might hit the country hard.

39 episodes

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