The senior Swiss women who went to court over climate change, and won

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This week, in a landmark case, the European court of human rights ruled that Switzerland’s weak climate policy had violated the rights of a group of older Swiss women to family life. Ian Sample talks to Europe environment correspondent Ajit Niranjan about why the women brought the case and what the ruling could mean for future climate policy.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
10 Apr English United Kingdom Science · Nature

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